GWP

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Name Global Water Partnership
Logo Image:gwplogo.jpg
Geographic Scope Global
Subject Focus Expertise Water Management
Contact E-mail: gwp@gwpforum.org
URL http://www.gwpforum.org
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Contents

Mission/Mandate

GWP´s mission is to support the sustainable development and management of water resources at all levels.

Key Resources

See also complete list of WaterWiki-documented GWP-Publications


IWRM Toolbox

The IWRM Toolbox is a free and open database with a library of case studies and references that can be used by anyone who is interested in implementing better approaches for the management of water or learning more about improving water management on a local, national, regional or global level. Altogether 54 different tools are presented in the GWP ToolBox. The ToolBox is organised in a hierachial manner with each tool embedded in the wider perspective of IWRM. The characteristics of each tool are described in the ToolBox such as to allow the user to select a suitable mix and sequence of tools that would work in a given country, context and situation.


Publications

GWP Technical Committee Background Paper 14 "Water Management, Water Security and Climate Change Adaptation: Early Impacts and Essential Responses"(2009) - Managers, whether in the government or private sectors, have to make difficult decisions on water allocation. More and more they have to apportion diminishing supplies between ever increasing demands. Drivers such as demographic and climatic changes further increase the stress on water resources. The traditional fragmented approach is no longer viable and a more holistic approach to water management is essential.
Status Report on Integrated Water Resources Management and Water Efficiency Plans (2008) - Managers, whether in the government or private sectors, have to make difficult decisions on water allocation. More and more they have to apportion diminishing supplies between everincreasing demands. Drivers such as demographic and climatic changes further increase the stress on water resources. The traditional fragmented approach is no longer viable and a more holistic approach to water management is essential.
IWMI-GWP:IWRM and Multiple Uses of Water - Single-use approaches to water development and management do not reflect the realities of poor people’s water use. People use domestic water supplies for activities such as irrigating backyard gardens, keeping livestock, fishing, processing crops and running small-scale enterprises. In areas without adequate domestic water supply, they use irrigation water to meet household needs, such as drinking and bathing, as well as to support a range of incomegenerating activities in addition to crop production.
Effective Water Governance:Learning from Dialogue - Effective water governance is necessary to solve the water crisis. Water governance determines the roles and responsibilities of the different interests – public, civil and private - in water resource management and development. Resolving the challenges in this area is necessary if we are to achieve sustainable water resources development and management.


Click Here for all GWP publications.

Work on the Ground

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About the Global Water Partnership

The Global Water Partnership's vision is for a water secure world. Its mission is to support the sustainable development and management of water resources at all levels.

The Global Water Partnership (GWP), was founded in 1996 by the World Bank, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency to foster Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM), and to ensure the coordinated development and management of water, land, and related resources by maximising economic and social welfare without compromising the sustainability of vital environmental systems.

The GWP provides a platform for multi-stakeholder dialogue at global, regional, national and local levels to promote integrated approaches towards more sustainable water resources development, management and use.

The network is open to all organisations involved in water resources management: developed and developing country government institutions, agencies of the United Nations, bi- and multi-lateral development banks, professional associations, research institutions, non-governmental organisations, and the private sector.

The GWP network works in 13 regions
Southern Africa, Eastern Africa, Central Africa, West Africa, the Mediterranean, Central and Eastern Europe, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Central Asia and the Caucasus (GWP-CACENA), South Asia, Southeastern Asia and China. The GWP Secretariat is located in Stockholm, Sweden.

The network is supported financially by Canada, Denmark, the European Commission, Finland, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Spain, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the United States.

HRH The Prince of Orange Willem-Alexander is the Patron of the Global Water Partnership. The GWP Chair is Dr Letitia A Obeng, GWP Executive Secretary is Dr Ania Grobicki and Dr Mohamed Ait-Kadi is Chair of the GWP Technical Committee.


alt=GWP map


The GWP network has more than 2000 partners in 70 countries in 13 regions.

External links

References

http://www.worldwatercouncil.org/fileadmin/wwc/Library/Publications_and_reports/Towards_a_Framework_for_Climate-Proofing.pdf

Vulnerability of arid and semi-arid regions to climate change-Impact and adaptive starategies (World Water Council, 2009) found in http://www.worldwatercouncil.org/fileadmin/wwc/Library/Publications_and_reports/Climate_Change/PersPap_04._Planning_Better_WRM.pdf

The implication of climate change on water (World water assessment programme, 2009)found in http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0018/001863/186317E.pdf

Water Adaptation in National Adaptation Programmes for Action, Fresh Water in Climate Adaptation Planning and Climate Adaptation in Freshwater Planning (Gunilla, B., et.al. 2009) found in http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0018/001818/181887E.pdf




See also

External Resources

Attachments

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