WaterWiki Toolkit: Q&A

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edit  ·  Toolkit WaterWiki 2.0 - The project
WaterWiki in UN-Water Context | Technical development issues | Managing WaterWiki 2.0 | WaterWiki - Wanted Content
WaterWiki-presentation Nairobi web4dev-conf Nov07 (Web4Dev Nairobi 2007 | Web2forDevConference findings) | The Contribution of a Wiki to the Development of a Community of Practice: A Case Study - Anna Maron Aug07 (Findings from study on WaterWiki by Anna)
Further resources: Knowledge Management Toolkit
WaterWiki 1.0 (Careful: Archived, non-updated version)
WaterWiki 1.0 Toolkit (FAQ | KM | Substantive | Technical | Process Step-by-Step) | "Outstanding Dev Issues" on WaterWiki 1.0 | Draft concept for the way ahead | New architecture (draft) for WaterWiki

This is an outdated page - please visit WaterWiki.net:Q&A for more updated Questions and Answers

What is a Wiki in general ?


See also: Wikipedia

Watch Jimmy Wales
Talk about the beginning of Wikipedia

(Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WQR0gx0QBZ4)

What's the difference to other websites ?

Every single page is editable by logged in users

A Wiki is particularly suited to collaboration among peers in networks and communities of practice. Think of it as a large black board, where all users are given chalk and sponges to start writing up, or edit existing text. Wikipedia, the famous online collaborative encyclopedia with the humble vision "to capture the world's knowledge" is perhaps the best known Wiki-project; tenthousends of users are working constantly and jointly on millions of articles/pages/entries.

No single organization or person "controls" the content

Quality control is achieved through "peer control": contributors or editors can easily be recognized with full name and affiliation, and the direct attribution to what users put up makes people think twice before posting.


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