Women and Water - Gender Dimension in Water Governance

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Selected Organisations: Gender and Water Alliance | Women for Water | SIDA | WECF - Women in Europe for a Common Future|
Other related articles: A Gender Perspective on Water Resources and Sanitation | Gender Guidelines Water Supply and Sanitation | Women and Water - Gender Dimension in Water Governance | Albania HDR: Pro-Poor and Pro-Women Policies and Development in Albania

Contents

The gendered dimension of water governance

Women are especially vulnerable to adverse impacts from climate change. Climate changes usually affect sectors traditionally associated with women; paddy cultivation, cotton and tea plantations and fishing. Prevailing social inequalities mean women typically have less adaptive capacity than men, and consequently bear a disproportionate burden of the climate change induced consequences. These include decreased food security, shortage of and reduced access to water resources and threatened existence, given their dependence on natural resources for their livelihoods.

Fact & Figures

Water is a basic element essential to all forms of life. Women are most often responsible for domestic and community water management in developing societies. On average:

  • women and children travel 10-15 kilometers,
  • spending 8 or more hours per day collecting water,
  • carrying up to 20 kilos or 15 liters per trip [1]

It was recently cited that in South Africa alone, women collectively walk the equivalent distance of 16 times to the moon and back per day gathering water for families [2]. In this role, women are responsible for determining sources of water to collect, quantity of water to be taken and the water’s hygienic quality. However, in this era of globalization, women’s decisions in regard to water management are often dictated by their social position, geographic location and increasingly by market forces.


Read the Source: Promoting and Protecting Women's Right to Water in the Context of Globalization and Feminized Poverty for more details..

Resources

Reports

A Gender Perspective on Water Resources and Sanitation

Promoting and Protecting Women's Right to Water in the Context of Globalization and Feminized Poverty

GWA - Gender and IWRM Resource Guide

On-line Resources
Mainstreaming Gender in Water Governance: A Resource Guide
Gender and Water Alliance
Gender Guidelines Water Supply and Sanitation
A Gender Perspective on Water Resources and Sanitation

Organizations

Women for Water


References

  1. Borjana (1998)
  2. Barlow and Clark (2002)

[1] Bulajic Borjana, Women’s roles – a policy overview, Waterline, Vol.17 No.1, July 1998, p7 [2] Maude Barlow and Tony Clark, Water Apartheid, The Nation, Aug, 15 2002.

See also

External Resources


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